were running states cp, politics, bizcon, security K, on case CO2 ag DA and turns
states cp is the shell from the generic
cp text: THE STATES AND TERRITORIAL FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS SHOULD ESTABLISH A FEED-IN-TARIFF ON ELECTRICITY UTILITIES, REQUIRING MANDATORY PURCHASING THROUGH REVERSE AUCTIONING.
CO2 ag DA is the shell from the generic we will read it on case
the politics scenario is obama good, its the same as the generic
the bizcon shell is the same one as the generic
the security K is up on the wiki under KO negs
case


1. FITs annihilate efficiency by discouraging competition between renewable energy
J.P.M. Sijm. 11/02. “The Performance of Feed-in Tariffs to Promote Renewable Electricity in European Countries.” __http://www.ecn.nl/ docs/library/report/2002/ c02083.pdf__ [Takumi Murayama]
Market compatibility and competition
Another major criticism of a system of feed-in tariffs is that it implies a distortion of free competition and, hence, that it is not compatible with a single, liberalised electricity market in Europe. Basically, there may be three problems with regard to this issue of competitive pricing and marketing. Firstly, feed-in tariffs do not go together with competitive pricing between generators of green electricity, which may result in less efficiency in renewable power production (as discussed above).


2. FITs decimate competitiveness through unfair renewable potentials
J.P.M. Sijm. 11/02. “The Performance of Feed-in Tariffs to Promote Renewable Electricity in European Countries.” __http://www.ecn.nl/ docs/library/report/2002/ c02083.pdf__ [Takumi Murayama]
Thirdly, grid utilities that are located in areas with a large potential of renewable energy sources will likely be offered more green electricity and will, therefore, have to pay more premium tariffs. In a liberalised electricity market, this puts these utilities at a competitive disadvantage relative to utilities in areas with low renewable energy potentials. Some kind of compensation mechanism could be designed to avoid this problem, as has been introduced in Germany since April 1, 2000 (see Section 3.1). Such a national mechanism, however, would complicate the administrative demands of a feed-in tariff system, while it would not solve similar problems at the international level.